mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.
The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.
'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”
"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)
r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language
(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 
Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.
Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 
Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).
Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black
Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé
Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  
Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 
Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  
Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 
Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.
In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:
Kem —  Black
Suten -  Royal
Nter —-  Holy, Sacred
Examples:
Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  
Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  
Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 
This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  
Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  
Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language
Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  
Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 
African Origins: 
The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 
Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 
Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order
Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)
Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  
Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  
Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  
The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”
"Oh yes, the black soil business.
Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.

The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.

'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”

"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)

r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language

(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 

Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.

Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 

Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).

Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black

Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé

Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  

Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 

Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  

Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 

Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.

In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:

Kem —  Black

Suten -  Royal

Nter —-  Holy, Sacred

Examples:

Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  

Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  

Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 

This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  

Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  

Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language

Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  

Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 

African Origins: 

The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 

Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 

Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order

Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)

Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  

Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  

Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  

The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”

"Oh yes, the black soil business.

Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

(Reblogged from gryphynshadow)

laterinthecaveoflesbians:

greatwhiteprivilege:

people who’ve never experienced financial woes: ummmm why dont you just work 100 hours a week, sell everything you own, including your organs lol?

"McDonald’s is always hiring! :)"

(Reblogged from markishajubilee)

faeriedroid:

fru-fru-racoons:

faeriedroid:

reblog for healthy polyamory ignore for unnecessary heterosexual love triangles

Except healthy polyamory isn’t an actual thing.

eggs and bacon ur mistaken

(Source: quartzwarrior)

(Reblogged from moniquill)

twlboaj:

hinoneko:

lord-kitschener:

i mean for fuck’s sake the daily mail vigorously fapping off to the idea that jack the ripper is in fact a jewish refugee from poland should have set of more alarm bells for people but naaaaaw

for my fellow americans who might not be keyed in on the context here: imagine fox news shitting themselves over the possibility that the zodiac killer was a mexican immigrant

a muslim mexican immigrant, no less 

(Reblogged from cumaeansibyl)

destiny-smasher:

So far, Steven’s powers have been:
A bright pink shield
A bright pink bubble
Magical healing saliva

And he is always STOPPING fights, usually peacefully and in nonviolent ways, trying to get both sides to get along and understand each other. Suffice it to say, he is not your typical superhero. In fact, he’s really not that super yet. He’s still on training wheels. And yet he often manages to end conflicts WITHOUT powers or weapons that destroy others.

And I love what this show is doing with him and all of his friends. Especially in a pop culture that is overpopulated these days with “save the world” shenanigans and focusing on powers and shock value instead of being “strong in the real way.”

I’m already proud of this little guy and the small steps he’s made. His journey isn’t one of leaps and bounds but baby steps, like real people.

This week’s wonderful two-parter has set up what the show has been foreshadowing for some while: that Steven, being half Human and half Gem, will forge a path that unites both kinds of beings — a path paved by acts of non-violence, understanding, and compassion. Where his merit and strength as a hero isn’t defined by his powers (which, BTW, completely fly in the face of typical superhero and gender role BS), but instead by HIS CHOICES.

And THAT is the kind of hero story we need these days, IMO.

I’m sick of watching characters save the world from evil.

I want to see characters saving themselves, saving each other — personal journeys about making choices and resolving conflicts, not just slapping “evil” around. Even SU’s plot twists don;t feel cheap. They feel rewarding, because they are always foreshadowed and always recontextualize earlier events that maybe didn’t make sense. They feel planned, thought out, CARED for, just like the characters who populate the world.

Steven’s story, especially given the moral ambiguities brought to the table recently, really has a lot of potential to do these things — to be a personal journey more than typical “destroy evil” stuff — and in many ways, it has already.

I believe in Steven.

(Reblogged from oak23)
(Reblogged from oak23)
(Reblogged from moniquill)

youneedacat:

casualblessings:

May you find relief from the bad memories of your past that make you feel unworthy

May you find such relief that the bad memories of your past can no longer make you feel unworthy, even when you have the memories.

(Reblogged from moniquill)

October 1

evilsupplyco:

{Year long Halloween celebration intensifies}

(Reblogged from moniquill)

October

evilsupplyco:

evilsupplyco:

With haggard breath and well worn claws, we dig through September, lurching to October.

The smells and wonders and haunts of sanctuary lurk just ahead. Just out of reach, moving ever closer. The illusions are slipping away, the mirages are fading, the torments are nearly over, and soon.

Soon. We will be home. And all will be right.

And all will be wicked, and wild, and wonderful.

Thirty-one days of healing, of strength, of cold energy. Just enough, just barely, to survive the coming year.

Soon.

Welcome home, my love. My beautiful love.

(Reblogged from moniquill)

celestedoodles:

a beauxbatons student inspired by this post 

(Reblogged from moniquill)

animatedamerican:

patrickat:

Censorship: The government says, “No, you cannot publish that.”

Not censorship: Your consumers say, “No, I find this problematic and I will not buy it.”

Yup.

Also not censorship: Your consumers say “All of you writers/artists need to stop doing the problematic thing if you want us to buy your product,” and encourage other consumers to say the same.

Also also not censorship: A fellow consumer of media says “Your arguments about how this is not problematic are wrong, and/or you are a jerk.”

(Arguably a form of censorship but not a violation of constitutional freedom of speech: the publisher / network / producer / website owner says “No, you cannot use my platform to say that.”)

And while I am pretty vehemently anti-censorship for a whole host of reasons, if you cite freedom of speech as a defense when called out for saying something repugnant, I will almost immediately take you a hell of a lot less seriously.

(Reblogged from betterbemeta)

arminsarmy:

marielovesgroban:

Don’t forget we have to wake up Green Day tomorrow.

Ok just a reminder to everyone: If you’re planning on tweeting billie joe armstrong “wake up” or something tomorrow, DON’T. The song is about his father’s death and so it’s really personal and treating it like a joke isn’t the right thing to do. Plus he’s asked so many times for people to stop and no one listens so yeah. Please don’t do that.

(Reblogged from moniquill)
theblackamericanprincess:

October yall

theblackamericanprincess:

October yall

(Source: viva-la-johnny)

(Reblogged from errors-dot-albi)

cyrilmusic:

burairium:

theneverendingdrums:

fejes:

peaceloveandbrittana:

this wins over other pro-gay commercials because you had no idea he was gay and then you can’t tell which one is his husband

they are showing them as people

not as gays and straights

fuckin love this commercial

can we just talk abotu the fact that the husbands arent even bringing the drinks over theyre just standing there next to the drinks and chatting

fuckin useless husbands

they are showing anyone can be useless. Even gay people


they are saying that it doesn’t matter if you are gay or straight. You can still be a useless person

this post got better

(Source: highonawindyhill)

(Reblogged from batlesbo)